News Digest: March 1, 2019

3/1/19, The Guardian: Rohingya crisis: Bangladesh says it will not accept any more Myanmar refugees

Bangladesh was lauded for its willingness to keep its borders open and welcome the hundreds of thousands of refugees with open arms. However Haque said the situation in Cox’s Bazar – where the millions of mainly Rohingya refugees are living in what has become the world’s largest refugee camp – was now untenable and had gone from “bad to worse”.

2/28/19, The Guardian: Last four refugee children leave Nauru for resettlement in US

2/27/19, PBS Newshour: Nearly 6,000 complaints of abuse at migrant children shelters made over four years

2/27/19, The Guardian: How do you express the voicelessness of children in detention? An opera without words

“I thought this problem could be agitated in a different way, so I decided to make a large-scale work that would address this problem.”

The result, Speechless, is playing now as part of the Perth festival. It is technically an opera; it uses “the structure and form of opera. We have an overture, we have duets, solo, an interlude,” says Hope.

The difference is this opera has no words.

2/25/19, Vice: ICE’s Rapid Expansion Has Led to Chickenpox, Quarantines, and Desperation

2/22/19, The Guardian: How the US government created a fake university to snare immigrant students

He (Guisado) cautioned that creating a sham university was in line with other tactics used by Ice, such as its habit also revealed last month of creating fake court dates for immigration hearings.

Guisado said: “This is not the first fake university that DHS created and I don’t think it will be the last.”

2/22/19, UNHCR and IOM: Venezuelan Outflow Continues Unabated, Population Abroad Now Stands at 3.4 Million

2/21/19, New York Times: Wait Times for Citizenship Have Doubled in the Last Two Years

2/21/19, Wall Street Journal: Immigrant Deportations Climb 150% in Two Years in New York City

2/20/19, The Guardian: Denver: immigrant teachers threatened with deportation if they join strikes

The Denver school district later apologized for the letter. Union officials said that under federal law, workers on visas who choose to engage in strikes with their co-workers are protected from deportation. However, the damage was already done.

“It resulted in a wave of fear that had a particularly chilling effect on our teachers,” said Denver Classroom Teachers Association president Henry Roman, an immigrant from Peru. “This is just a scare tactic to intimidate our immigrant educators.”

2/20/19, Time: Lawmakers Call for Probe Into ICE for Force-Feeding Immigrants on a Hunger Strike

2/20/19, Center for American Progress: Language Access Has Life-or-Death Consequences for Migrants

2/20/19, NBC News: Immigrants innovate at higher rate than U.S. citizens, study shows

Itucas is far from the only immigrant founder of a venture capital-backed startup in the U.S. A 2016 report by the National Foundation for American Policy said that immigrants had founded more than half of America’s startups valued at or over $1 billion.

More recently, a working paper from researchers at George Mason University released this month said that immigrant-owned firms in the tech industry had “uniformly higher rates of innovation” than firms run by U.S. citizens in 15 of the 16 measures they surveyed.

2/16/19, Desert News: Life at the border: Church volunteers fill the humanitarian gap to help migrant asylum seekers in Arizona

Opinion

2/25/19, The Hill: With low birth rate, America needs future migrants; Pew Report mentioned in piece: Key findings about U.S. immigrants

2019-03-07T13:03:37-05:00